From April to June 2020,
the military recorded active duty deaths as follows

128 deaths by suicide, up from 115 during that period in 2019. That represented an 11.3% increase. And in the third quarter of last year, 154 service members lost their lives to suicide, up about 22% from 126 the previous year.

Chief Warrant Officer Cliff Bauman: Suicide never entered his mind. Then 9/11 happened.

The active-duty Army has seen a 30% increase in 2020 in deaths by suicide, from 88 deaths by suicide in 2019 to 114 this year, The Associated Press has reported.
“In the face of additional stress of a pandemic, we are working to improve access to behavioral health care while enhancing our resilience training and stigma reduction efforts,” according to their statement.

  • Suicide Lifeline

    If you or someone you know may be struggling with suicidal thoughts, you can call the U.S. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255) any time of day or night or chat online.

  • The Military/Veterans Crisis Line

    Online chat and text-messaging service are free to all service members, including members of the National Guard and Reserve and veterans, even if you are not registered with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) or enrolled in VA health care.

    Call 1-800-273-8255 and press 1.

  • If you are grieving the death of a loved one who served, you can contact the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) at 800-959-8277.

5 Warning Signs of Suicidal Behavior That Are Easy to Miss

Suicidal warning signs should be taken very seriously. There are some signs that are obvious, such as talking about suicide and dying, but others are much more subtle and can be easily missed. It is important to know the signs, especially for those who have risk factors for suicide. Early detection of warning signs can lead to professional help and mental health treatment and can even save a life.

There isn’t really any typical pattern of behavior for someone who is suicidal, but there are common warning signs. You may see one or more of these in someone contemplating suicide. These are the signs that are generally clear and easy to observe:

  • Talking about dying or wanting to die
  • Talking about feeling empty, hopeless, or having no way out of problems
  • Mentioning strong feelings of guilt and shame
  • Talking about not having a reason to live or that others would be better off without them
  • Social withdrawal and isolation
  • Giving away personal items and wrapping up loose ends
  • Saying goodbye to friends and family

Having risk factors for suicide does not mean that it is inevitable. If you or someone you care about has one or more of these, though, you need to be especially aware of and on the watch for warning signs, family history.